A Wild Reverent Rapport

Four days in the near wilderness of Algonquin Park reminds me again who I truly am beneath, behind, beyond the idolatries of ego and the trappings of modernity.

Getting down to basics, returning to Nature, reviving the body where trees breathe cascades of colour into the cells, restoring the soul with crisp air and cold water and clear songs of owl and loon and a distant wolf in the night, take me into a wild reverent rapport with the courtesies of an interconnected life.

Modernity manufactures deficit swathes across broad bands of soulscapes. It’s a clear cut of the wildish self out of holistic harmonies. Loud. Rude. Crass. A rock in the way of the road? Blow it up. A forest in the way of the mine? Cut it down. A swamp in the way of a parking lot? Drain it. Animal people or human people, insect or fish people, plant or elemental people ousted from their ancestral homes? Ah. The price of progress. But what have we lost?

Modernity has got us bamboozled with its sleight of hand technologies that make us think how great we are with our internet and electric wires and almost instantaneous self gratifications. But did you know that Nature orchestrates solar systems and galaxies into harmonious orbits, bone and skin damage into radiant repair, seed germination and DNA replication in perfect measure, without our needing to know how? Did you know that our cells emit light? 

The wild intensity of a vital longing or a keen psychic stalking after a passion have been modified to fit a day planner–or eliminated altogether. The inspired life is ceded for the benefit and pension plan. And the light emissions from your cells, the life bright biophotons, fade.

Kids are scheduled right out of all make-believe from their own imaginations and adults are often either the walking dead going through the motions or the energized bunnies of a pop culture craze hopped up on paradigms of productivity and behavioural adjustment.

The healing of a junk culture may require not more planning and measuring, not more efficiency and control technologies. The healing of a junk culture may demand a rewilding of the soul; a re-enchantment with the more elusive curves of the psyche; a renewed appreciation for the vibrant instincts and vital intuitions that flow—like rivers through changing landscapes, around obstacles, over rough patches, across shallows—and carve out favourable pathways without the need for straightening up or hammering to.

A collective healing may require a renewed willingness for captivation with things of mystery and magic; the humblings of awe that include its dread with its raptures; a commerce with elusive edges and evocative ambiguities; a living outside the egoic technologies made to harness and enslave everything pliable, trophic, natural.

The deep healing of a culture’s soul requires a restoration of a sense of charm and the charmed—in every soul. The rewilding of a stiffly scheduled society requires the trophic rejuvenators of play and playfulness.

Rewilding means a return to a wise reverent rapport with the living flow in all things.

Let it be. You’re standing smack dab in the midst of The Now Field. How could this not be doable?

{photo by me of Loon Canoe, an old ally of mine, retired now to a sling beneath a porch, but still a bearer of stories and birther of worlds}

 

Karma & Will: Dedicated Focus Brings Radiant Results

Gandhi understood will. He understood the vibrant vibratory power of an insuperable will dedicated to a higher purpose. Many of us might not call our own will power insuperable, but dedicating our focus in that direction strengthens will and extends our vibrational oomph.

Gandhi combined the great traditions of Western secular law and Eastern spiritual law in his practice of Soul Force. Soul Force is non-violent ceaseless persistence of a group will in a common liberating purpose—in partnership with the cosmic dynamo of organizing élan.

Gandhi inspired the peaceful liberation of India from British rule. The emotional magnetism of soul force was unstoppable. Ultimately, he was murdered for his devotion to non-violence and liberation.

His path wasn’t easy. His death was messy, tragic, iconic. His legacy—unshakeable. How did he sustain the mental focus and strength of devotion to hold to the course of destiny? Firstly, he knew that he had to be the change within himself that he desired for his beloved India. He had to align with the liberating force of the All Soul. So, in his daily life, he rested his mind in meditation and his heart upon The Bhagavad Gita.[i]

The Bhagavad Gita is one of the sacred Hindu and world scriptures. The title means “the song of god.” The Gita was Gandhi’s bible. It’s a gorgeous poem about karma yoga—the yoga of dedicated action—and union with The All Soul. It’s a Book of Wisdom, a Book of Power, a book of super power definitions and practices.

If this text were a book of power in a fantasy story, it would be the much thumbed, used and worn, scraggly little leather bound pocket book that a Glinda, Gandalf, Yoda, or Dumbledore might carry deep in a secret fold of a luminous skirt or roughspun cloak. But The Gita is not fantasy, though the powers it describes as available to the devoted heart and insuperable will are indeed fantastic.

The Gita describes the laws of yoga that liberate us from conditioned living to creative living, from ignorance to enlightenment, from mediocrity into majesty. It focusses much discussion on the relationship between karma and will.

In yoga, tapas is a synonym for will. Tapa means self-governing. B.K.S Iyengar describes tapas as a fervent, unwavering, disciplined devotion to practice.[ii] And that takes will power.

Literally, tapas means fire. Figuratively, it can mean austerity. Poetically, it’s the fire and focus of the awakened, liberating will. Tapas is the practice of dedicated attention and intention toward a desired path. In yoga, such dedication of willing practice leads to union with the divine esprit of limitless manifesting power.

Gandhi was determined in devotion and devoted to his determined path. Caring, committed, and co-operative in soul force, he didn’t budge, he wasn’t budged. He had an insuperable will.

While reading The Gita fed his soul, daily meditation focussed his mind and strengthened his will. Any meditation that trains your attention to focus on one thing is a primary practice to develop will power—our power of creative choice.

Ultimately, the insuperable will is surrender of ego, of the Me-centre. It’s a surrender into the limitless I AM—what I sometimes call the cosmic orchestrating élan of everything. It’s the paradox of giving and receiving: giving over everything gains everything.

A willing discipline leads to willing surrender. And surrender leads to liberation. Tapas, that animated joyful devotion to a particular practice, opens a path for your wild and singular destiny to blaze its way through your heart and into your life.

A practice of daily living fuelled by a deep driving desire, guided by dedicated will, and supported by action, may not always be easy. A disciplined devotion may not be easy at first; but dedicated focus brings radiant results.

If you want your wild and singular life magnetized by the liberating blaze of living flow between finitude and infinity, practice a willing devotion to disciplined attention. It leads to a willing surrender of ego unto trust—a trust in the vibrant vibratory source of everything. Then destiny is yours.

[i] Stephen Mitchell, (2000). The Bhagavad Gita. Bhagavad Gita. New York: Three Rivers Press.

[ii] Iyengar, B.K.S. (1996). Light On The Yoga Sutras Of Patanjali. London: Thorsons. p. 30-31.

Soul Force

Gandhi understood will power. He understood the vibrant vibratory power of insuperable will dedicated to a higher purpose. Many of us might not call our own will power insuperable, but dedicating our focus in that direction strengthens will and extends our vibrational oomph.

Gandhi combined the great traditions of Western secular law and Eastern spiritual law in his practice of Soul Force. Soul Force is non-violent ceaseless persistence by a group will toward a common liberating purpose—in partnership with the cosmic dynamo of organizing élan.

In yoga, tapas means self-governing. It’s a synonym for will. B.K.S Iyengar describes tapas as a fervent, unwavering, disciplined devotion to practice.[i] That takes will power.

Literally, tapas means fire. Figuratively, it can mean austerity. Poetically, it’s the fire and focus of the awakened will. Tapas is the practice of dedicated attention and intention toward a desired path. In yoga, such dedication of willing practice leads to union with the cosmic dynamo of organizing élan.

Gandhi was determined in devotion and devoted to his determination. Caring and co-operative in soul force, he didn’t budge, he wasn’t budged. He had an insuperable will.

The Bhagavad Gita, the Hindu song of the lord, was Gandhi’s bible. The Bhagavad Gita describes the insuperable will as surrender of our little ego willfulness, the Me-centre, into the limitless I AM, the Great Will of The Infinite.

A disciplined devotion may not be easy; but dedicated focus brings radiant results.

If you want your wild and singular life magnetized by a living flow between finitude and infinity, practice a willing devotion to disciplined attention. The liberating blaze of discipline leads to a willing surrender of ego unto trust—a trust in the vibrant vibratory source of everything. Then, destiny is yours.

[i] Iyengar, B.K.S. (1996). Light On The Yoga Sutras Of Patanjali. London: Thorsons. p. 30-31.